Wersi OAX Controller Questions

This video is in response to some questions & comments posted on the Deep Dive video. Rather than just posting screenshots it was easier to show the differences and talk about them in a video.

Not sure that I answered the questions vs. the possibility of bringing up more of them!

26 thoughts on “Wersi OAX Controller Questions

  • 02/01/2019 at 12:44
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    Hi John,

    The OAS Manual details all the features available in the software, but like most manuals it doesn’t tell us much about how these can be used. Here’s how it all works.

    There are three options for placing internal/external sounds in OAS, on the manuals and pedals, on a track in an accompaniment style and on a track in a midi sequence. (I’ve excluded VST sounds because the VST host in OAS is an old version and can’t support most modern plug-ins, so it’s not relevant to this discussion). There are two external midi output ports, and for each one of these ports there are separate midi configuration menus for these three options. So taking each of these in turn:-

    1) Manuals and pedals
    The OAS provides 9 fixed midi channels for the sounds on the manuals and pedals, and each one of these is associated with a unique selector into which we place our sounds. There are 4 selectors for the upper manual (midi channels 1-4), 3 selectors for the lower manual (midi channels 5-7) and two selectors for the pedals (midi channels 8-9). So when configuring the midi output port menu for the manuals and pedals, we have a choice as to how we define these channels. Your observation that we could set them the same as the OAS selector channels is quite correct, and in fact for the sake of consistency this is just what we want to do. So we start by configuring the midi output port 1. Midi channel 1 is set to selector 1, midi channel 2 to selector 2 and so on all the way up to midi channel 9 on selector 9. Now when we place an internal (OAS) sound in a selector it’s routed to the OAS sound engine, and when we place an external (midi out 1) sound in that same selector it’s routed to midi output port 1 and on to the externally connected device. There’s no possibility of a channel clash because we can only put one sound, internal or external, in a selector, and of course we can have a mix of internal and external sounds across the selectors. Nothing goes wrong here, the system doesn’t stop working, the OAS doesn’t crash and we don’t get any error messages. We can configure the midi output port menu for the manuals and pedals in any way we wish, for example we could put midi channel 5 on selector 1. All that happens now is that an internal sound is transmitted on midi channel 1 and an external sound is transmitted on midi channel 5. This gives us great flexibility for those occasions where we need to have the external channel assignments different to those of the internal channels.

    2) A track in an accompaniment style
    We have 7 spare midi channels on midi output port 1. These can be assigned on the midi out accompaniment menu as follows. Midi channel 10 for the drum track, 11 for the bass track and channels 12-16 for the accompaniment tracks ACC1-ACC5. Actually there is a second drum track available in every style, but most styles don’t use this so it’s not a big deal to exclude it from the assignment. Now as was the case for the manuals and pedals, placing an internal sound on any one of these tracks plays an OAS sound, whilst placing an external midi out 1 sound on the track plays a sound on the external device, and as before we can have a mix of internal and external sounds across the tracks. So now with just one midi output port we can play all the sounds on the manuals and pedals at the same time as all the sounds from an accompaniment unit style.

    3) A track in a midi sequence
    Now we hit a problem, we’ve used up all our midi channels on midi output port 1. So we move over to midi output port 2. The midi channels in a midi sequence are assigned to the tracks in such a way that track 1 is midi channel 1, track 2 is midi channel 2 all the way up to track 16 which is midi channel 16. So on our midi sequence menu for midi output port 2 we copy this assignment, using all 16 available channels on the port. As before an internal sound on a track plays an OAS sound whilst an external midi out 2 sound on the track plays a sound on an external device. And as before we can have a mix of internal and external sounds across the tracks, and because the manuals and pedals are on a different port to the midi sequence, we can play both together

    NOTE TO CURT: We have yet to explore using midi out sounds in styles and midi sequences in OAX. Since we can change an instrument on a track in both of these, if this also gives us access to the midi out user sounds, this should be possible. However we hit the same problem again with regard to which type of midi assignment to use, dynamic or fixed. Definitely worth a couple of videos though I would suggest!

    Hope this makes things clearer John.

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 02/01/2019 at 16:29
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      Beautiful discussion from all involved. I was most likely recording a new video when some of these comments came in, and I’m just now reading them – Join us over at http://wersiclubusa.com/oax/just-what-does-zuordnen-mean-anyway/ as we continue the discussion.

      For the next few days, we don’t have a physical MIDI device, so we switched over to using an internal VST. There are a few subtle differences, but MIDI is MIDI and for the most part still working as before.

      Jeff – Notes were taken on your “NOTE TO CURT:” section. Remind me if we don’t cover this discussion in future videos.

      Reply
  • 01/31/2019 at 10:49
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    Hi Curt and John,

    I agree with everything you say John, but the issue I think is not so much the way that the midi system operates, more the way that Wersi have chosen to implement it. And here we see a fundamental difference between OAS and OAX both in structure and operation.

    In terms of structure, OAS works on an exclusively fixed channel assignment system. Each layer (selector) on the manuals and pedals has a uniquely designated channel number, so when a sound is placed in a selector the channel is associated with the SELECTOR not the sound. It’s a robust error free system. With OAX it’s the opposite. We can have fixed channel assignment or dynamic assignment or a mix of both. In all cases the channel is associated with the SOUND, not the layer where it’s placed. Dynamic assignment works fine, but with fixed assignment and mixed assignment there are potential problems. With the former when the user has specified two or more different sounds with the same channel number, and with the latter when both the user and the system are trying to allocate the same channel number. It’s a flaky error prone system.

    In terms of operation, we can see this more clearly with the two issues that Jerry and Curt have identified. If I understand what Jerry is doing correctly, he’s running Kontakt as a VST on an OAX1 and selecting Kontakt sounds using the appropriate program change codes. The problem seems to be that the OAX cannot distinguish between internal (OAX/VST) sounds and external (midi out) sounds. So the midi data for the sound gets copied to a midi output port and sends unwanted information to the audiostation that he has connected. As I said in a previous post, an OAS channel can be configured to stop this happening so now the internal and external parts of the system are completely isolated.

    Curt identifies the problem of potential channel clashes. With OAS this can never happen because each sound is placed in a different selector and therefore will have a different channel number. With OAX we can have two completely independent activities taking place simultaneously, channel assignment by the user at the same time as channel assignment by the system. As I said in my previous post we could attempt to ‘fool’ the OAX by the order in which the sounds are placed, but a better solution would be for the OAX to do this for us. So if we had a dynamically assigned OAX sound on a channel that clashed with the fixed channel of a user sound, it would nice to think that the OAX would recognise this and re-assign the OAX sound to a new channel. This is tricky of course because there may be other OAX sounds present that would also have to be re-assigned, and now it gets messy.

    It’s all indicative of Wersi’s decision to go for dynamic assignment, it can have unforeseen consequences. There’s an old saying well known amongst design engineers, “It’s impossible to make anything fool proof because fools are so ingenious!” In other words, if there’s a way to screw up the system, someone somewhere will find it. So at the implementation stage of the design process we need to anticipate all the things that can go wrong and construct the design in such a way that these can’t happen. The OAS does this perfectly, the OAX relies on blocking these occurrences and the issuing of error messages. The former is an example of good design, the latter, well let’s say could do better!

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 01/31/2019 at 14:06
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      Looking at the OAS manual it appears that only the VST sound channels are fixed, as the Midi out channels can be assigned in the Midi settings page, it also looks to have a problem in that there is nothing to stop you assigning a Midi and/or style sequence channel the same as a manual channel, which would also create problems, (Or is it like OAX and gives you a warning) at least OAX does at least warn you (As does virtually every other Midi controller on the market) so that you can take corrective measures.

      There should not be any interaction between the VST Host and the Midi outs on OAX unless it has been really poorly designed. (Looking at the manual all VSTs and Midi outs have their own independent program banks so there should not be any interaction)

      The manuals on OAX can have a maximum of 16 sounds, which correspond with 16 Midi channels, so there should never be any problem with dynamic assignment.

      Reply
    • 01/31/2019 at 19:03
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      Jeff,

      You are correct on my situation. I have over come this situation it’s just takes a little more time to get everything to work together.

      Jerry

      Reply
  • 01/31/2019 at 05:37
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    OAX has a total of 64 midi channels available for the manuals; these are separated into 4 independent banks with 16 channels each, 1 bank is for internal sounds, 1 bank for Midi out 1, 1 bank for Midi out 2 and 1 bank for Midi USB out. (NOTE: OAX 1 & 500 only have 48 channels and 3 banks as they do not have Midi USB out)

    Each piece of Midi equipment (Whether software of hardware) can only play 1 sound at a time on a single Midi channel, (If you try to get it to play 2 voices on the same channel an error is thrown up) fortunately Midi has an inbuilt a check system (Assuming it has been properly designed) that will warn you if you try to do the impossible, (This applies to any Midi controller not just OAX) so the error shown in OAX is quite normal. (NOTE: If the connected equipment has its own pre-set system that can be accessed by program change, then this effectively becomes just one sound, as the connected equipment automatically assigns the different sounds to its own internal channels)

    OAX allows a maximum of 16 sounds on the manuals (Not sure about Werischord as the manual is not clear) which can be a mix of any of the 64 channels.

    Reply
    • 01/31/2019 at 07:20
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      John – 100% agree that you can only use a channel to do one thing at a time. For me what’s missing in the current OAX implementation is you don’t get a choice of what to do should you select a channel already in use. The system (OAX) will remove the “first” voice using MIDI channel X. For me, I would prefer the prompt to give me the option to remove the voice already assigned to the channel (what OAX does now) or allow me to cancel the assignment of the second voice that is assigned to the same channel.

      Reply
  • 01/30/2019 at 16:05
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    Hi Curt,

    Ah right, now I see the problem.

    What we need is the same nifty feature that we have on OAS. Every MIDI Out channel can be configured in one of two modes, ‘Standard’ or ‘Sound’.

    In Standard mode any sound, either internal OAS or external MIDI Out, that we place on a channel is routed both internally and externally. I think the idea is that you can play two sounds simultaneously on the same channel, one an internal OAS sound and the other a MIDI out sound on an external device. I’ve never understood the practicalities of this because the Program Change Codes of the two sounds will usually be different, and only one of these codes can be placed on the channel.

    In Sound mode, the MIDI Out channel is only activated when we place an external sound on that channel. So placing an OAS sound on the channel plays an internal sound, and placing a MIDI Out sound on the channel plays an external sound. It’s one or the other, we can’t have both. This is the mode I use for the HD Series, and it’s what I think we need here.

    It’s a bit messy, but if we have a mix of internal and external sounds in OAX, can we not solve the problem by the order in which we place the sounds in a total preset. Place the external sounds first with their fixed MIDI channel assignment, then the OAX sounds which will be assigned dynamically. Since the external sounds have fixed channel numbers and therefore take priority, the OAX will have to assign the next available channel numbers for the OAX sounds and a clash cannot occur.

    Would this work, or is there another ‘catch’ that I’ve overlooked?

    Too bad our experiment with the “Mystery CC Drawbar” didn’t pan out. It was worth a try though. I guess it’s going to be one of those proverbial Wersi oddities like the two reverb units (Reverb1 and Reverb2). What on earth is the Reverb2 for?

    Jeff

    Reply
  • 01/30/2019 at 09:50
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    Hi Jerry,

    Just checking that I’ve understood the nature of your problem. If I understand you correctly, this is what you would like to do.

    On the AudioStation, you would like to run Kontakt with 6 instrument banks, each one assigned a different midi channel. So midi channel 1 for instrument bank 1, midi channel 2 for instrument bank 2 etc. Now suppose we want to play two Kontakt sounds together, one from instrument bank 1, say a flute on midi program 5, and the other from instrument bank 2, say a piano on midi program 10. To do this we will need to set up in the OAX two of the 128 external midi sounds available on a particular midi out port, let’s say midi out 1. So for the flute we set up midi channel 1, program 5, and for the piano we set up midi channel 2, program 10.

    To play both of these sounds together we will need to add both of these external midi sounds to the upper manual. So are we saying that the OAX will allow us to add one or other of these sounds, but not both?

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 01/30/2019 at 10:57
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      Jeff – the “catch” here will be if channel 1 and or 2 are already in use for an internal OAX sound. If they are you get an error message about a MIDI conflict, OAX will remove whatever sound is using the same MIDI channel you requested and assign the voice you selected to whatever manual you selected. This all ties back to the “sys(x) channel assignment when you create a voice.

      I’m actually in the midst of messing with this right now using the SD40 to show a couple of ways of doing things and then was going to ask folks which solution they prefer best. In this case, it will be based on what you can/can’t do on the Ketron side to work with(around?) OAX and MIDI channels already in use. I’m planning on installing Kontakt internally just to play around to show the pitfalls and then was going to run it on an external PC to compare the differences when using OAX to control it.

      Jerry – did I get that right with what you are seeing?

      Reply
  • 01/29/2019 at 09:18
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    Hi Curt,

    Regarding the “Mysterious CC Drawbar”, our dear departed Bill* used to complain about the lack of physical MIDI controllers on Wersi consoles, so perhaps this is a nod in that direction. Here’s a couple of things we could try.

    1) Have a closer look at the CCs on the Edit CC menu to see if any of them relate to this drawbar. If so this might enable us to use this drawbar to control functions in a VST.

    2) If you still have Cakewalk connected, try waggling this drawbar to see if you get any response. It might be that this is brought out as one of the standard CCs on the external MIDI system like the mod wheel, volume controls etc.

    In both these cases, with software that has a MIDI Learn facility we should be able to use it to control whatever function we require.

    3) If not 1) or 2), it might just be a “Fashion Control”, i.e. something that just looks good on the console!

    * I should make it clear that as far as I know, Bill hasn’t departed this life, merely the Wersi fold!

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 01/29/2019 at 13:03
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      Jeff,

      1 – Nothing appears to match up. Clicked edit, tried assigning a few different controllers and then moving the drawbar in and out – Nothing on the screen changes.

      2 – I do still have it connected for some other stuff we will mess with in the future. No data transmitted when moving that drawbar in/out. One comment on that. We also have no way to assign which MIDI out it is sending to. I was only testing on MIDI over USB. At this point, I have not moved my Focusrite downstairs which would allow me to connect up to Cakewalk via MIDI Out 1 and MIDI Out 2 although I doubt we will see any difference.

      So at this point, we are at #3!

      I still run into Bill from time to time over on Synthzone… He is missed here.

      Reply
  • 01/29/2019 at 06:46
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    Hi Geoff,

    Yes, very strange behaviour from the Attack and Release Controls.

    Going along with our idea that the Manual Controls appear to be common to all sounds, whilst the Sound Controls are more instrument specific, you could make a case out for these two parameters to be included in either category. In the Manual Controls because they are part of the ADSR (Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release) envelope which is common to all sounds, or in the Sound Controllers because they have particular values for each instrument, e.g. long sustain for a guitar, short sustain for a xylophone. I favour the idea of placing them in the Sound Controller as in OAS, that seems to make more sense. It’s difficult to see though why they should be on both controller menus, especially when their mutual operation is so weird.

    I don’t think this arrangement is a sign of things to come, Wersi don’t do partial updates, they tend to issue these as complete entities. I rather think there’s a simpler explanation, it’s just been very badly designed both in structure and operation. Or to put it more succintly, they’ve made a complete pig’s ear of the whole CC provision!

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 01/29/2019 at 07:09
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      Just to add more ??? to this whole conversation let’s not forget the mysterious “CC” drawbar that appears to do nothing located on the top left with all of the other various volume drawbars. I’m guessing OAS instruments don’t have this? if they do what does it do?

      Since I tend to record most of the videos via a Teamwork connection from our Mac to the Sonic, maybe I should sit at the organ a few times and see if that drawbar does interact and we are missing that along the way.

      Reply
    • 01/29/2019 at 07:10
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      I did mess with these a little last night and I’m not even sure I can explain them other than to say that they clearly interact with each other.

      Reply
  • 01/28/2019 at 21:41
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    I found something interesting while programming my AudioStation. As I’ve said in another conversation I am using Kontakt for several of my sounds. For instance I have a instrument bank setup on midi channel 1 and so on. If I select a sound in instrument bank midi channel 1 or 2, OAX also sends that same midi information out the midi 1 and 2 outputs. I am using midi out 2 only to send program change information to the AudioStation. If I was using a sound in Kontakt on instrument bank 2, it was interfering with my program change for AudioStation. It was sending conflicting information. Took me a while to figure this one out.

    I am using the multitrack player on the AudioStation for my backing tracks. Amazing how much better it sounds compared to the OAX. Sounds like the instruments are actually in the room with you.

    Reply
    • 01/29/2019 at 06:50
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      Jerry,

      I’m re-reading the first paragraph trying to follow. Do you have both outs and ins connected? If so, are they acting as MIDI Thru or in some other way passing data where not expected?

      For the multitrack player are these MIDI or audio tracks? If MIDI are they playing OAX, Kontakt or other sounds in the Audiostation? You run Kontakt on the Auditostation is that correct?

      Reply
      • 01/29/2019 at 20:22
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        I am running Kontakt on the OAX1. I am running my backing tracks on the AudioStation which are audio tracks and some VST instruments. I have Kontakt loaded with 6 instrument banks. I found out that if I use a instrument in Kontakt on Midi channel 1 or 2, OAX also sends that midi information out the midi outputs. So if I send a program change 10 on midi channel 2 to load sound 10 in Kontakt, OAX will also send that information out the midi output 2 which conflicted with the AudioStation since I use midi output 2 to control the presets. I would really like to run Kontakt on the AudioStation however OAX will only allow you to load one midi out 1 and one midi out 2 even if you want to use different midi channels.

        Here is a little more explanation how AudioStation works.

        You can create presets in the AudioStation kinda similar to the OAX. The presets in the AudioStation can be controlled using program change messages. The AudioStations mixer channels are also midi channels which can be enabled or disabled. The master output is midi channel 16 which also stores the entire config for all channels. Mixer channel 14 is reserved for the audio player which can play stereo or multitrack audio files. All channels can have up to 4 VST’s loaded per channel. For example: I have Mrs Robinson backing track loaded in channel 14. I have Native Instruments B4 II loaded in channel 1. I save the entire config as preset number 011.
        Then go to the OAX1, use the current sound module and load midi out 1. Then set the routing to midi channel 1 and program number to whatever sound I am using on the B4 II. Then I drag another module from the sound pool. I load midi out 2 and set the midi channel to 16, MSB to 0 and Program to 11. Now whenever i load this preset on the OAX it will load the appropriate preset on the AudioStation. I use midi output 2 only to load the presets on the AudioStation.

        Jerry

        Reply
        • 01/30/2019 at 07:09
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          Jerry, timing is everything. I was thinking about working on a video this morning that would be similar but in my case again working with the Ketron module. This was to go back and continue where Carlo and I left off a discussion about using one vs. two MIDI outs.

          I’m thinking I might also load up Kontakt again both on OAX and then on the P/C I have connected to show/compare running an internal VST vs. Jeff’s external / 2nd processor design.

          Reply
  • 01/28/2019 at 08:57
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    Just something I noticed regarding the duplication of attack and release over the manual and sound controllers. I had assumed that these were identical, but it appears that they are not.

    The manual controller release slider seems to act as a master control. If this is set to zero, then the sound controller release slider has no effect.

    As an example. Select a single sound on the upper manual, go to the manual editor and reduce hall, chorus, echo and attack to zero just to remove any unwanted effects. Also set release to zero. Now go to sound control and adjust release to any value. Even at 100%, there is no release heard.

    Now set the sound control release back to zero and go back to manual controller and increase release to around 90%. Hit a key and release it. The release effect will be heard for around 5 seconds.

    Note that release is heard even though the sound controller release is at zero. Now back to sound control and increase release to around 90%. Hit and release any key and notice release time has increased to around 10 seconds.

    I cant think why it would be like this. Maybe its a forerunner to whatever is coming in the next release?

    Geoff

    Reply
    • 01/28/2019 at 14:15
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      Fascinating find Geoff. I haven’t had a chance to try while listening yet. Makes me wonder if there is more “magic” hidden that we haven’t found yet. Sadly there isn’t much in the manuals about this particular section of OAX. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a major manual update with the next OAX release and to have it in English! 🙂

      Reply
  • 01/28/2019 at 07:06
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    Hi Curt and John,

    Many thanks Curt for the Video, much appreciated. You’re doing a great job of explaining what Wersi have succeeded in making a very convoluted process! There are some things I want to check with you in relation to saving the various CCs.

    Routing Menu
    Here the mechanism for saving a newly created MIDI sound, or saving a modified existing one, is to click on the Edit Sound button, answer yes when asked to save the sound and this takes us to the MIDI sounds Soundlist where we have the option of saving the sound with the given default name or a name of our own. So far so good. Now what happens if we save the sound with the default name then repeat this process to create a second MIDI sound, perhaps with different parameters, and attempt to save this with the same default name. Will the system:-

    a) Overwrite the existing first sound.
    b) Throw up an error because the two sounds have the same name.
    c) Rename the second sound in the way that Windows often does by adding say an _1 to end of the name

    Manual Controller Menu
    Here again the mechanism for saving a modified MIDI sound, for example if we have changed the position of a CC slider, is to click on the Edit Sound button and follow the process through to the MIDI sounds Soundlist. So this seems relatively straightforward.

    Sound Controller
    Here we appear to have two mechanisms for saving the sound. If we have made a change to the CC number using the Edit CC option, we are invited to save the sound when we exit from the Edit CC menu. At this point its slider will be active, so if we wish to adjust this do we have to go through the whole process of re-entering the Sound Controller menu again, adjust the slider then save using the Edit Sound button.

    I agree with John, putting a Save option on these menus would have made things a whole lot simpler.

    Just to address John’s questions regarding the sound editor. The 6 sound controls that we see in the Sound Controller sliders are actually the standard 6 controls provided by the sound engine that OAX uses to generate most of its sounds. It’s an old, out of date Steinberg product called Hypersonic that was discontinued way back in 2009, and as far as sound control goes is pretty basic given that most musical instruments have considerably more than 6 parameters that can be adjusted. Wersi pick 6 parameters that are specific to the sound and place these in the Sound Controller sliders. As I recall the duplication of the Attack and Release parameters appeared in OAX 2.0 which amongst other changes caused a number of Sonic owners to wonder whether Wersi had lost the plot. So effectively we are now down to only 4 sound controls.

    OAS uses the same Hypersonic sound engine but has a separate sound editor that operates on two levels. At the basic level we see the 6 instrument specific Hypersonic sound controls (no attack or release duplication though), and at the advanced level we have some general controls like Cut Off Filter and Resonance adjustment, and another set of instrument specific controls. All of these can be saved to create another version of the sound.

    So the answer to your question John as to where is the OAX equivalent of this is ….. there isn’t one! Maybe Wersi will provide such a feature in the future, or perhaps they take the view that they already have such a feature in the Sound Controllers, albeit limited, and the ability to save it in a preset.

    Jeff

    Reply
    • 01/28/2019 at 07:30
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      Jeff,

      Our posts crossed – We must have hit enter at about the same time. The answer to your question is:
      a) Overwrite the existing first sound.

      BUT…

      Just tried a quick test and you can’t overwrite the default “MIDI Out sounds” although you can save it with the default factory name. That’s uh… “interesting”? If you don’t rename, It simply goes into a “user” location in the Soundlist with the original factory name. After that, all future edits happen to the “user version” as you continue to make changes. Of course, the better answer is to rename as part of saving with a name that is meaningful to you.

      Excellent answer on the sound engine. Thank You.

      Reply
    • 01/28/2019 at 14:38
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      Hi Jeff
      I suggest you send any control enhancement ideas to Uli at the Music Store. They normally provide an email address with the updates if you do not have a contact.

      Reply
  • 01/27/2019 at 11:22
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    HI Curt

    Nice video, but there are a couple of questions?
    1. Why are the Attack and Release sliders duplicated in Manual and Sound Controllers, as from what I can gather (After translating this part of the manual into English) the sound controllers are supposed to be for advanced settings and duplicating 2 of the sliders (That could be used for more advanced settings) seems a bit of a daft decision.
    2. I presume if you want to modify a sound you have to go into the sound editor, (Which means it’s the same as most manufactures instruments) however adding a save button would certainly make life easier.
    3. Could you do a video on the sound editor (Or post some screenshots) as there is no mention of it in the manual as far as I can see. (I presume it has got one just like other manufactures have)

    Reply
    • 01/28/2019 at 07:13
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      John, My thoughts:
      1) – I have the same question on the Panning slider. It shows up in both the “Manual Controller,” and also in the “Sound Controller.” What’s the difference? If there is one, I didn’t figure it out yet.

      2) – Well, that’s the catch. There isn’t a “Sound Editor” to the best of my knowledge. At least not what you would expect.

      3) – See #2. Rumor on the streets is a new version of OAX will add a sampler function. Could it be that when that is released, it will also include an editing function and perhaps clear up some of the confusion with the current implementation?

      Reply

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