OAS / OAX Sound Demo – Tune#3

Next up in our OAS – OAX comparison project? Amazing Grace.

Same as before:

  1. OAS version is first.
  2. Next, the OAX version using the MIDI file with the levels as set by OAS.
  3. And then the OAX version with minor volume changes to the MIDI file. As John noted on Tune#2 – Clearly a difference in the drum samples. I turned them down just a little along with the Pedal Bass and Rock Sax tracks.

 

For reference, here are the volume levels in the MIDI file before and after the changes that I made on OAX:

Amazing_Grace_NoMix
Amazing_Grace_NoMix
Amazing_Grace_ReMix
Amazing_Grace_ReMix

Based on the file name the next tune in the list is something called “Ambobpolka”. I suspect that is an abbreviated name of the actual tune. I haven’t listened to it yet so no idea what the real tune name is, or if we will need to make any volume changes to it or not. Coming soon…

15 thoughts on “OAS / OAX Sound Demo – Tune#3

  • 01/11/2018 at 17:45
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    A multi-sample is when you sample each note at different velocity levels. Each note could have as many as 127 samples. This makes the instrument sound more real. Drums sound more realistic multi-sampled. All instruments do not need multi-samples. I think the basic GM sound set is not multi-sampled. Not sure about GM2 sounds. Take for instants a note on the piano. The harder you hit the note the sound of the note changes. In order to get that realism you have to sample it (which is another word for recording it) at those different levels.

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  • 01/11/2018 at 08:43
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    Multi-layer sampled drums have been used by manufactures for years, (Although they pale in comparison to drum VSTs) although in OAS they are limited due to memory restrictions. (If you have R46 or R47 and have the Drumsets 1 & OAA activated then you can view the multisamples & loops in the new drum editor, as well as import your own in WAV format)

    Regarding the demo, as with the first tune the sounds are more rounded and realistic (Not massively though as they are the same voices) with better positioning of the sounds, (Easier to determine where they are in the mix) with the revised drum sets also standing out. (Note: If you are using the internal speakers or typical computer speakers then they may sound the same, but play they through external speakers or a quality audio system and the differences easily stand out)

    Bill

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    • 01/11/2018 at 09:29
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      Thanks for the info Bill.
      Question: Is that the same as the Realdrums that are present and that are used in OAS?

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      • 01/12/2018 at 03:51
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        Hi John

        No, The Real Drums are audio recordings of a real drummer playing a real drum kit, which is then split into sections to allow them to synchronise with the Midi Clock of the style.
        NOTE: The Real Drums in OAX are more advanced than OAS as the sounds do not get chopped off at the end of the loop or when using fills. (As far as I am aware the audio loops in OAX still use the .rex format as used in OAS though)

        Bill

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  • 01/11/2018 at 07:20
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    The “Ambobpolka” is in fact the “Amboss-Polka”. The Componist was a German componist and military bandmaster. He was living from 1 januari 1824 born in Wiesbaden, Gemany, died on 27 juni 1888) was een Duits componist en militaire kapelmeester. The Amboss-Polka is a classical music piece, listen to it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll0_Cydaps0

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        • 01/11/2018 at 07:44
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          07:44 EDT

          I’m located on the east coast in Florida about 15 miles south of Daytona Beach.

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          • 01/11/2018 at 09:20
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            Oké that is not so bad, I thought about 3:00 am that it was in the States.

  • 01/11/2018 at 07:01
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    I keep in my opinion that only a few sound tracks sound louder. There is a small difference between the OAX organ as on the OAS organ. I hear a very small difference in the attack of the guitar and therefore sounds the guitar a slightly better, but the whistling in the applause sounds better in the OAS. Beyond the sound volumes, in my opinion the difference in sounds is barely audible.

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    • 01/11/2018 at 07:20
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      John, Don’t know if you are aware of this or not? With the recent update of OAX to 1.50.x There are a couple of comments in the README file that will have some impact on our little experiment.

      Both of these comments are directly copied from the README file:

      Drums with multi-stage samples
      All drumsets and drum samples have been reworked. Here, multi-stage samples per drum sound are now also widely used.

      Something else: Since OAS Software 7, the previous sound engine has been used by an American company and filled with our WERSI sounds. A few months ago, the sound engine was bought and we can now optimize and further develop the WERSI sound engine for the OAX-System. One of the first results is the new optimization of the accompaniment system.

      Reply
      • 01/11/2018 at 07:35
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        Oké, No, I was not aware of that, Now I am well aware of it. Bud what are a multi-stage samples??
        I have never heard of them.

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        • 01/11/2018 at 07:55
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          I could be wrong but I think they are referring to taking multiple samples at different velocities resulting in a more realistic sound when you play at those different velocities.

          A good example would be something like hitting a bass drum which causes the snares on the bottom of a snare drum to make a small sound even though they are reacting to the bass drum.

          We have some sample libraries we use via VST’s that offer that type of realism. May / may not be what Wersi is referring to?

          Reply

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