Coming Soon – OAX / VST Fun!

Today was a big day for us as as we completed the initial upload of two month long project over at our sister site (IMMusic). We have a few updates left to do but we do see the light at the end of the tunnel on that project. One of the things we left on the back burner, while we working on our IMMusic project, was to take a little more time and work with OAX and the ability to use various VST’s that are out on the market.

While we have loaded a few VST’s and proven they do load and play within OAX, we have not taken the time to truly integrate them into OAX and how well they will work in a live performance scenario.

As you all know Jeff has done an outstanding job showing you how you can accomplish that on OAS (and most of his efforts will also apply to OAX). Don’t know what we are talking about? Check this out.

At the same time another great contributor to the WersiClubUSA site, Bill has offered multiple suggestions on various VST’s that “should” work within OAX. Many of these include effects type processing… Reverbs, delays, EQ’s etc.

Although it will be another week or so before we can really dig into this topic we just wanted to update everyone that it has not been forgotten and we are anxious to get back to work on this project and share what we learn.

If you smell smoke or hear a big boom – Not to worry, it’s only us blowing up our Sonic learning all about using a VST… 🙂

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “Coming Soon – OAX / VST Fun!

  • 07/21/2017 at 11:54
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    Hi Ross,

    Just for information, the retail price of the Albion One library is £399, which at the current exchange rate converts to something in the region of $500. The Kontakt Player is free. For that we get four major instrumental sections, namely a wide range of orchestral instruments, cinematic percussion, synthesiser sounds and special effects. There are in excess of 430 individual sounds in the library, each offering up to 10 different articulations and arpeggiators. So taking an average of 5 of these per sound gives us 430 x 5 = 2155 completely individual sounds!! This is a conservative estimate since the synthesiser and special effects sections are ‘real’ synthesisers with their own comprehensive set of variable controls.

    You are quite right in your assertion that this is professional level software. However there is a difference between what a professional musician might do with it and how we might use it on an electronic organ. The former is generally a Composition application whereas the latter is a Performance application. In a composition application the musician would typically have a bank of libraries installed in the sample player covering a wide range of different instrumental sounds. Also, it wouldn’t be unusual to have for example half a dozen different string libraries. This is because each will exhibit different characteristics and the composer might want to use a particular library for a particular piece of music, or alternatively layer a number of these together to obtain a particular sound. This concept could also be applied across a number of other instrumental sections e.g. brass and woodwind, so the costs can mount up considerably.

    We could of course replicate this arrangement if we wished in a performance application, but as you suggest, it would be more usual to choose just a small number of libraries with only the instruments and characteristics that we require. My own preference is to have the Wersi sounding like a real orchestra hence my choice of the Albion One library. Everyone will have different musical preferences, but the great advantage of this approach is that there’s a library available for every kind of instrument, so users can install only what they need, and this makes the process very cost effective.

    Libraries like the Albion One mean that we’re playing with the big boys now. Folks might have noticed that I’ve been using high end packages for all of the HD Series demos. This is deliberate policy because the design needs to be tested under worst case conditions, and worst case conditions occur when the available computing resources are significantly stressed. So we use the Advanced version of Hauptwerk with the largest sample sets, the commercial version of VB3 and large libraries like the Albion One in Kontakt. Furthermore, we layer a number of sounds together from the libraries within Kontakt e.g. strings with brass, woodwind and percussion, and then layer these with sounds from the other packages. We might for example have strings from one Kontakt library layered with a Steinway grand piano from another and then mapped onto the bottom manual of a Wurlitzer theatre organ running in Hauptwerk. It’s fiendish I know, but there’s a guy on YouTube who’s done just that with a MIDI based computer music system. So why not on a Wersi. All of this of course is because we wish to replicate the same facilities that are available in the OAS/X where any sound can be layered with any other sound. It’s unlikely that most players will want to create these extreme operating conditions, but we have to cater for all eventualities. And whatever level this software is being used at, it’s always a good idea to quantify the software loading on the system, and the computing resources required to support it.

    Jeff

    Reply
  • 07/20/2017 at 16:54
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    HI Curt, Bill
    I had a more serious look yesterday at Albion One and they are talking about $10,000.00 for the full set up. Whilst the orchestras are amazing it is a package for professional music arrangers, but for the amateur most of the stuff I would not use. I am more interested in getting additional individual realistic instrument sounds, like sax, cello’s, euphoniums, etc. which this software does not appear to have.

    Getting back to VST drawbars or Hauptwerk, I have tried both of these with limited success.
    I run and additional 24″ touch monitor but the VST control desks remain very small and very, very fiddly and frustrating to use. These images can not be expanded and in particular the round control knobs are very difficult to change and drive me nuts, I also could not work out how to get the VST drawbars to be controlled by the organs drawbars. Perhaps you guys have more knowledge and are going to help here, but for me I like the registrations etc. controlled by the organ console, so far I am not very impressed with VST’s.

    Reply
  • 07/20/2017 at 14:03
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    Hi Ross,

    Yes, the Albion One is indeed an amazing orchestral library. There’s a huge variety of these type of libraries on the market. I looked at quite a number of them when considering what to install on the Scala HD, and decided that this was one of the best. The quality and authenticity of the sounds together with an impressive range of articulations makes it far superior to anything we have in the OAS/X database.

    You might also want to check out the companion to this library, the ‘Spitfire Percussion’. Taken together they provide a very comprehensive coverage of just about every instrument in the orchestra.

    http://www.spitfireaudio.com/shop/a-z/spitfire-percussion/

    Jeff

    Reply
  • 07/19/2017 at 18:35
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    WOW I have just ahd a quick look at Albion One simply amazing. I can’t wait for this tutorial

    Reply
    • 07/20/2017 at 06:37
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      Hey Ross – To get back in the game and remind myself how it all works I’m thinking I’ll go back and revisit the Hauptwerk setup we did a few months back and follow that up with the always hot topic of drawbars. I’ve got a copy of Konkat so maybe we should give Albion One a try? I’ll have to take a look and see if they offer any type of demo that we can download (assuming we can get Konkat working on OAX).

      We are still about a week away from getting started but once we do it should be an interesting project.

      Reply
      • 07/20/2017 at 08:38
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        Hi Curt
        When loading Kontakt make sure you use the 128 patch setting, (Option when loading into Wersi VST Host) as you will then be able to set up a Multi in Kontakt for greater flexibility.
        Note: You can change the patch settings at a later date, but easier to set it up straight away.
        Have fun
        Bill

        Reply

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